Submission Guidelines

Editorial Guidelines for Articles of Permaculture magazine, North America

Permaculture magazine, North America is a quarterly magazine that focuses on sustainable agriculture and lifestyles. We have both a North American and European/International division, and cater to readers with an interest in learning about permaculture efforts and skills from the experiences and knowledge of others. Our readers range from professional permaculturists to novices who are eager to know more. If you are interested in submitting an article or artwork for inclusion in a future issue of Permaculture magazine, North America, please read the following submission guidelines:

Articles should be 1000 words or less with 3-10 high resolution photos/artwork/graphs for editors to choose from. As often as possible, we seek articles that integrate practical, hands-on information that work with a storyline to engage the reader on many different levels. Most importantly, we want the readers to be able to take away information from articles that they can implement into their own lives.

 

Permaculture magazine looks for articles that are building blocks for creating a new sustainable culture, offering ideas, inspiration, and practical models for people to experiment with and test out. We desire print articles that focus on practical applications rather than anecdotal topics. With our online articles, there is a bit more leeway in topics and structure, but should still be tightly written and permaculture related. Stories that are more promotional based rather than story or hands-on will receive less consideration.

 

Article submission, including those specifically solicited, does not guarantee publication.

 

Please read on for more detailed recommendations for submissions:

 

You are welcome to email with questions or story proposals at any time after reading these guidelines.

 

Content

 

Permaculture magazine readers are interested in:

  1. Practical, inspiring article about projects that encourage and empower people to do something for themselves and/or their community, whether it be planting a garden, building a structure, setting up a renewable energy system, learning a craft, starting a community project, how-to/DIY, small-scale projects. Also appreciated are innovative people-care ideas such as how communities/groups organize themselves, make decisions, or resolve conflicts. Articles published in Permaculture help other people and projects around the world that are looking for practical ideas, models, ways of working etc… Whenever possible, the critical factor is to include tested step-by-step instructions for others to use and adapt.
  2. Permaculture magazine also welcomes articles on a wide range of subjects relating to sustainable living. These can be stories about eco-villages, communities, post carbon economies, and alternative energy projects. We are looking for examples of pioneering news, reviews, reader’s solutions. We appreciate critical thinking and good writing.

 

We are NOT looking for ideological stories about sustainable living – to persuade others – we are more interested in realistic appraisals that will provide genuine guidelines and real-life examples to help others develop and formulate their own ideas and projects.

We are NOT looking for promotional pieces. If you are interested in telling the story of your company, make it a relevant example for others to learn from, incorporating storyline and practical information. Advertisements and Classifieds are available in the magazine and online to spread the word about specific business endeavours and permaculture courses.

 

Tips for Potential Contributors

 

Please be familiar with Permaculture and with the contents of our magazine. Please read recent copies of our publication and online stories prior to submitting a query. Submissions that fall too far outside of the scope of the magazine’s permaculture emphasis will not be included. All articles should be tightly written, proofread, and well documented with citations when possible. The contents should be practical, informative and have a distinct voice that appeals to our readers.

 

Note: We accept submissions from all writers, whether they are North American or not. Although our main focus is on North American content, stories universal in content or about international projects will still be considered.

 

Length

 

We are generally seeking a maximum length of 1,000 words per article. Less is welcome. Reader’s Solutions section and Reviews should be shorter. If a topic absolutely needs more room to convey the message, please be in touch to discuss.

 

Submitting

 

Preferably, articles should be sent electronically, as a google doc or in the body of an email. Let us know if you have a preference to print or web publication. Submission does not guarantee publication.

 

Submissions may be emailed to submissions@permaculturemag.org. To ensure that it is properly filtered into the correct folder, please use the following headers in the Subject line:

Attn Editors: Permaculture magazine Article Submission

 

If computer access is a problem, hard copies may be mailed in if necessary.

Call (707) 634-4548 for details or mail to:

Permaculture magazine, North America

P.O. Box 8

Cotati, CA

94931

 

Editorial Guidelines for Photographs/Illustrations

 

Photographs are a vital part of bringing an article to life. Please only send photographs that illustrate your article’s topic and are of high quality: sharpness, composition and color quality. The pictures should add to the story, not just be filler. As Permaculture magazine is printed at 300dpi (dots per inch), please send pictures at the highest resolution possible. A simple guideline is that JPEG format pictures should be at least 1000k (1MB), preferably 4MB. Potential cover images are required to be a portrait aspect of at least 2600 x 3660 pixels (4.5MB minimum).

Images should be sent in JPEG, TIFF or RAW format as an email attachment or via Dropbox to hannah@permaculturemag.org. Please include a separate email to alert of a Dropbox delivery. Prints and slides are acceptable only in exceptional circumstances (ie: when the content is unique and without digital equivalent and the author is unable to convert to digital).

Each image should include a one to two sentence caption, photographer credits and, when possible, the names of anyone within the photograph, and of course, permission of everyone in the photo. A photo release is required for minors. We can email a release form if you plan to submit photos of minors. Pictures of all minors MUST be accompanied by a model release form signed by the parents or guardians of the child. It is the photographer’s legal responsibility to ensure all pictures are cleared for reproduction with permission of the photographer and subject for use in both print and online forms of Permaculture magazine. If you send a large number of photographs (20+), we will contact you for captions and credits on the images selected.

Diagrams, graphs, or artwork are welcome and should be JPEG files or TIFF files at 300dpi or higher.

If you have any editorial questions please contact the editors, Hannah (hannah@permaculturemag.org) or  Cassie (cassie@permaculturemag.org)

Compensation

 

We regret that at this time, it is not possible to offer financial remuneration for articles or photographs. However, each writer whose article is published in the magazine will receive a print copy of the issue that their article appears in, recognition, the ability to reach a large audience throughout North America, and help contribute to spreading permaculture.

Thank you for your submissions, your time, and your participation. This is truly meant to be a publication for the Permaculture Movement, and your voice will help it grow.

 

Permaculture magazine, North America
P.O. Box 8
Cotati, CA
94931

(707) 634-4548

Editors: Cassie Langstraat & Hannah Apricot Eckberg

 

Permaculture cannot be responsible for returning unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, illustrations or other materials. The inclusion of a SASE will allow for returns, but we are unable to predict or be accountable for the actions of the postal service after any returns are sent.